CFUW Press Agency

November 2017


In this Issue:  

 

Cities for CEDAW Campaign

By: Isabella Fletcher
Student Intern, St. Paul University

CFUW on Facebook 
By: Jenna Smith 
Member Engagement Coordinator 


Following up with FundScrip
By: Jenna Smith 


 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 
  
These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.
 
If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Robin Jackson, President at cfuwed@rogers.com

Cities for CEDAW Campaign


Developed by the UN Commission on the Status of Women (UN CSW), The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), is known as the International Bill of Women’s Right’s as it sets up guidelines on how the advancement of women will be achieved. It is legally binding on States that have ratified the treaty. Canada ratified CEDAW on December 10th 1981. The convention is made up of 30 articles ranging from what State Parties commit to do to promote equal rights, to outlining specific forms of discrimination, to stating how CEDAW is to be implemented and monitored. 186 of the 193 United Nations member states have signed the treaty. The only industrialized country that has not ratified CEDAW is the United States of America.

The lack of action by nations in eliminating discrimination against women catapulted grassroots organizations to organize the ‘Cities for CEDAW’ campaign. The goal of this campaign is to raise awareness about the CEDAW treaty and to implement its articles at the municipal level. The campaign slogan is to make ‘the global local’ via ordinances and resolutions that localize the CEDAW treaty. In 1998, San Francisco became the first city in the world to implement a CEDAW ordinance at the local level. Their campaign gained support from the San Francisco Department on the Status of Women, Amnesty International and the Women Inter Cultural Network. Advocating for the Cities for CEDAW campaign in any given community will require three fundamental actions. The first is to conduct a gender analysis on city operations, the second to create an oversight body and the third to secure the funding to support the implementation of the CEDAW principles.

A success story! Since San Francisco implemented CEDAW as a local ordinance, the city has gone 44 months without a domestic violence homicide. Developed by the UN Commission on the Status of Women, the Convention addresses the advancement of women, describes the meaning of equality and sets forth guidelines on how to achieve it.

There was also an in-depth gender analysis of city agencies, especially government agencies who examined their workforce and their programs and budgets to ensure that they were all working according to non-discriminatory principles, and serving all communities. The local government also created more community-based prevention and intervention grant programs dealing with violence against women.

For more information on San Francisco’s accomplishments, click here.  Following the success of San Francisco with this campaign, five other cities have established a local CEDAW ordinance.

The CFUW National Office has gained inspiration from the Cities for CEDAW program in the United States and is now creating a program and toolkit for clubs to implement Cities for CEDAW in their own municipalities. Stay tuned for more on this topic!

By: Isabella Fletcher, Student Intern, St. Paul University

Engaging with CFUW on Facebook
 

If you have ever been confused when you’ve tried to connect with CFUW on Facebook, you are not the first. Between the CFUW Facebook national group and page along with the multiple club Facebook accounts, it’s easy to get lost in the social media world. My goal is to explain what each of these different accounts are for and how we can all help raise CFUW’s online presence most effectively.
 
Facebook GROUP--  Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW) - National
This is a closed group used to CFUW members across the country. The group was set up by an individual CFUW member for the purpose of acting as an informal kind of forum where members could communicate online. Currently it is composed of 870 members. Any CFUW member with an individual Facebook account may join this group simply by requesting to join. Any members may post in this group to share relevant articles, club news, and upcoming events. Only members of the group see the posts made in this group and it is not used for the purpose of raising awareness about CFUW initiatives to the public at large.
 
Facebook PAGECFUW FCFDU
The Facebook page is a way for CFUW National to broadcast information to members and non-members in an official, public manner. The Facebook page is for CFUW to share articles, resolutions, partnerships, events and initiatives that are relevant to the organization’s work. The content of the page is managed by the Advocacy Coordinator and the Member Engagement Coordinator at the National Office and it is designed to educate the public about CFUW, promote the work of our partners, highlight events and scholarships from clubs, and recruit new members to join our organization. Rather than “join” this Facebook page, you can “follow” the posts by clicking the “Like” button at the top left of the page. To increase the visibility of CFUW’s online presence it is important that all of our members like the Facebook page, invite your friends to like it, and engage with the content posted.
 
Engaging with the Facebook PAGE
The average Facebook user has access to more than 1,500 posts per day but only looks at 300. The Facebook algorithm is the thousands of factors, or signals, that Facebook uses to determine which posts should be among the 300 that get served up in a user’s News Feed. Basically, it’s how Facebook curates an overwhelming amount of content into a manageable chunk for the individual user. This means that Facebook users only see the content that the algorithm has determined is relevant to them. If you follow a page or have friends on Facebook, but you never like their content or engage with their pages, you will not see their content in your news feed. So when you click the like or share button on CFUW content, Facebook will make sure that this shows up on your feed and the feeds of your friends who follow CFUW. The more visibility the Facebook page has, the more people will go to it to learn about CFUW and join in its clubs and initiatives.
 
Engaging with other Group’s Facebook 
You will also notice that many of the clubs have their own Facebook pages. Engaging with one another on Facebook is a great way to raise awareness about events and issues your club wants to promote. I would encourage you to share your pictures, upcoming events, scholarship news on your Facebook pages and be sure to like and share the content that other clubs post. The National office is also happy to broadcast club events that you would like to share from the official CFUW page.

Prepared by: Jenna Smith, Member Engagement Coordinator 

Following Up with FundScrip 

Last month, CFUW hosted a webinar to provide more information about the FundScrip program. FundScrip is a fundraising program for nonprofits that allows organizations to meet fundraising goals through an easy-to-manage gift card program. It is designed to allow your club to raise funds simply by encouraging members to shop at their regular stores with gift cards instead of cash/debit/credit. Supporters order gift cards to participating retailers and when they purchase these gift cards, the nonprofit receives a 2%-13% rebate. Gift cards are sold to members and supporters at face value. There are over 227 retailers from categories including groceries, gas, pharmacy, home improvement, department store, restaurants, pizza, coffee shops, household items, clothing stores, movies & books, travel, and more.
 
During the Webinar we heard from Mary Ann Roscoe about  CFUW Sudbury’s experience using the program for the last six years and we were introduced to Claudine Thompson, who is the FundScrip representative that will manage all of CFUW’s accounts as new clubs sign up. If you were unable to join the webinar and are interested in learning more about this fundraising opportunity the links and documents below will provide you with all the information you need to get started.

To view the recorded webinar, click here.
To access the Best Practices document created by CFUW Sudbury, click here.  
To read advice on using the Paper Order Form program option, click here.  
To view a full list of participating retailers, click here.

Claudine will be working with each club that signs up to determine individual fundraising goals and timelines and advise which of the 3 program types would be best for you. You can contact her by phone or email: 

Claudine Thompson, FundScrip Coach
(514) 861-1234 x 106 
cthompson@fundscrip.com
www.fundscrip.com
www.facebook.com/fundscrip

Prepared by: Jenna Smith, Member Engagement Coordinator 



September 2017

In this Issue:  


The Charitable Trust: Scholarships, Fellowships, and CFUW
By: Kathryn Wilkinson, VP Education and Charitable Trust Board Member

Surrounded By Smart Women – Gwen Black, CFUW President, 1970-74
From the Tantramar Heritage Trust Press Release

Newest Affinity Partnership
Prepared by Jenna Smith 

Fundraising Program for Clubs 

New Interest Groups: Learn through MOOC

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 
  
These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW Member Resources website for use at any time. You can find them on the site HERE.
 
If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Robin Jackson, Executive Director at cfuwed@rogers.com

 The Charitable Trust: Scholarships, Fellowships, and CFUW 

September is always an exciting time for CFUW as the Clubs begin to meet again, friends reconnect after the summer, and study and Interest Groups resume activities.  It is also the time of year when many Clubs collect their membership dues.  Some Clubs include a donation to their scholarship fund with the Club registration and most Clubs also engage in some form of fundraising activity for their Scholarship Program: Book Sales, Card Nights, Lectures, Shows, House Tours, and more.   In 2016-2017, CFUW Clubs awarded $1,034,348 in scholarships.  So,  if your Club is already engaged in fundraising for scholarships, you might ask the question: “Why donate to the Charitable Trust?”.
 
Since its founding in 1919, CFUW has supported graduate study, literacy and creative arts through awards and fellowships. Originally, the funding for the awards and the administration came from CFUW but in 1967, the Charitable Trust was established as a separate entity with the mandate to award fellowships across the country to women university graduates for advanced study and research.  Some Clubs do have programs in place to support graduate study but Clubs generally concentrate most of their local programs on girls as they leave high school and enter first degree programs. The Charitable Trust is CFUW’s national program.  Each year, the Charitable Trust allocates an amount for fellowship awards which comes from interest earned on the CT capital and donations from Clubs and individuals.   In 2016-2017, the Charitable Trust awarded $92,500 in funding bringing the total awarded by CFUW in 2016-2017 to $1,126,848. 
 
Many of the women who have received support from the CT are profiled on the Charitable Trust website at http://cfuwcharitabletrust.ca.  One of the major fundraisers for the CT is the Charitable Trust Breakfast at the AGM and the keynote speaker is always a former recipient of a CT Fellowship but this year was a little different.  At the last moment, the speaker had to withdraw and Betty Dunlop (National Office administrator for the Fellowships Program) came to the rescue and arranged an alternative speaker, Faith Eiboff, the recipient of the 2017-2018 Ecole Polytechnique Award.  Faith is in the last year of her PhD program; she is a single mother who is putting herself through school.  As she completes her PhD, her daughter will enter her first year at University. Faith’s work examines the housing and health related impacts of violence on homeless women and uses research to inform the development of gender responsive services – a topic of potential interest to CFUW members across the country.  When we support the CT, we are doing more than offering a woman the opportunity to complete her education; the CFUW Charitable Trust supports Canadian women doing advanced study and research in science, mathematics, engineering, home economics, education, visual arts, music, humanities, and social sciences. The Trust also provides financial assistance to Aboriginal women studying law, medicine, nurse practitioner, optometry programs, and Aboriginal studies.
 
Last year, the CT received $13,716 from Clubs across the country.  An electronic AGM could mean the loss of considerable income for the CT as we will not have the CT Breakfast and we will also lose the proceeds from the CT Boutique.  The CT is asking Clubs and individual members to consider expanding their support for scholarships to include our national program.   One very easy suggestion is a Tooney for the Trust where Clubs have a collection box at general meetings and ask individual members to donate a tooney to support advanced study and research by Canadian women across Canada. 
 
Prepared by Kathryn Wilkinson, VP Education and Charitable Trust Board Member

Surrounded By Smart Women – Gwen Black, CFUW President, 1970-74


The Tantramar Heritage Trust has published a new book entitled Surrounded By Smart Women by author Larry Black, Gwen Black’s grandson.
 
The 166 page book details the lives of two Maritime Women: Statira Caldwell McDonald and her daughter Gwendolyn McDonald Black. The story begins in Wolfville, N.S. in 1876 with the birth of Statira and ends in Sackville, N.B. with Gwen’s death in 2005. With bits of family lore and occasional warm humour, the author carefully chronicles the significant events in the lives of these two women from Acadia University, to a Parsonage in Alberta, Lasell Junior College for Women in Auburndale, Massachusetts; Mount Allison Ladies’ College, and the Canadian Federation of University Women. The narrative is a compelling story of mother and daughter’s ability to maintain very high standards as professionals while working through adversity and at the same time being wives and mothers. Both women were well ahead of their time in promoting women’s education and activism.
 
Gwen Black was very well known in Sackville, having spent most of her adult life in the Town. Arriving in Sackville in the fall of 1928, she attended Mount Allison Ladies’ College, graduating in 1931. In 1933 she acquired a Bachelor of Music degree from Mount Allison and thereafter had a lifelong association with Mount Allison’s music program, initially as a teacher and always as an avid supporter. She married Sackville businessman Laurie Black in 1935 and Sackville became her permanent home.
 
The author details many interesting historical facets of life in the Town, particularly during the war years. Gwen Black became deeply involved as a volunteer in numerous organizations within her adopted community and a leading force in most of them. She was also most active in Mount Allison affairs, serving on the Federated Alumni, Board of Regents, Senate and President’s Committee on the Status of Women. Her work with the Canadian Federation of University Women was especially notable as she served as National President from 1970-74.
From Tantramar Heritage Trust Press Release

Newest Affinity Parntership for CFUW Members 


CFUW is excited to announce that we have officially included VIA Rail Canada as our newest Affinity Program to offer members. This Partnership with provides all members with a 5% discount every time they travel using VIA Rail. This 5% discount is for all destinations, and all fare categories, with the exception of the Escape fare, and the Prestige Fare, on the Canadian (Toronto to Vancouver train). Moreover, this discount applies to both your business and your leisure travels. You can have up to 3 people (friends, family, colleagues) travelling with that can also benefit from the discount, as long as you are travelling with them.
 
To receive the 5% discount the next time you travel with VIA Rail, use the following Discount Code when booking: 811167. You will need to provide proof of CFUW membership (member card) along with photo identification when you pick up your tickets or when you are boarding with an electronic ticket. If you do not have a membership card, you can print one off and fill it out at this link here.
 
If you would like to ensure that you receive this discount every time you travel, simply go online atwww.viarail.ca and create a profile. In your profile, you will be asked to select a discount type. Select “corporate rate’’ and enter our six digit corporate number: 811167. Find additional instructions for creating a VIA Rail profile here.
 
As the use of this discount code increases, VIA Rail will increase the percentage of discount offered to CFUW members. So ensure that you are getting the word our to your club members about this new partnership! Happy Travels.


Prepared by Jenna Smith, Member Engagement Coordinator 

FundScrip: Easiest way to Raise Money for your Club

 
FundScrip is a fundraising program for nonprofits that allows organizations to meet fundraising goals through an easy-to-manage gift card program. Originating in Montreal, Canada FundScrip is designed to allow your club to raise funds simply by encouraging members to shop at their regular stores with gift cards instead of cash/debit/credit. Members order gift cards to participating retailers and when they purchase these gift cards, the club receives a 2%-13% rebate. Gift cards are sold to members at face value. There are over 227 retailers from categories including groceries, gas, pharmacy, home improvement, department store, restaurants, pizza, coffee shops, household items, clothing stores, movies & books, travel, and more.
 
CFUW Sudbury, Sherbrooke, and Kingston have all used the FundScrip program and found it a successful initiative. Moreover, this fundraising program has successfully raised thousands of dollars for school groups, religious groups, clubs, sports teams, etc. Read some of the success stories here.

 
CFUW National thinks that this is a perfect fundraising platform for our clubs and would love to give you the resources and support you need to set this up for your individual club. This fundraising model would allow you to sell gift cards to your members and the community at large for everyday things (like gas and groceries) during times they would normally be shopping (Christmas, back to school, special events, etc.) and raise money for scholarships, special club projects, advocacy initiatives, and any events your club is programming.

 
How to sign up: 

  • CFUW is working directly with a contact at FundScrip to get each club set up with their own account. To sign up, email Claudine Thompson at cthompson@fundscrip.com who will provide you the information you need.
  • Upon signing up, you will receive an invitation code and activate an online account.
  • You will then complete an Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) application so that payment for the cards can be taken from your club’s account. (You can also set up a separate account for this program)
  • Print off order forms and a list of available retailers and distribute to your members. (Remind members that these do not have to be used as gifts, but can be used for regular gas and grocery shopping that they would do normally. They just need to change the card they pay with to make your club money!)
  • A representative of your club collects the order forms and payment from members at the end of each month and enter the orders into your online account. (To avoid additional credit charges, it is best if members can pay with cash)
  • FundScrip processes orders 4 days a week after they have confirmed payment. Orders typically take 3 business days to be delivered.
  • Orders are delivered in individual envelopes for each member with their specific cards enclosed

Learn more about Fundscrip in the links below:

To learn more, join the Webinar on Thursday, October 26 at 2pm ET. 
Contact Jenna Smith at cfuwgen@rogers.com for more details. 

 

Educational Interest Group Opportunities for Clubs
 

If your members are looking for an opportunity to dive into interesting and complex topics, hear from experts, and receive high quality learning for free, then a MOOC might be the perfect interest group for your club. A “MOOC” is a Massive Open Online Course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web. In addition to traditional course materials such as filmed lectures, readings, and problem sets, a MOOC provides interactive user forums to support community interactions among students, professors, and teaching assistants.
 
Both the CFUW Oakville Club and the Education Committee have been participating in these online courses as a way to grow in knowledge and engage in challenging discussions around various topics. Combining the concept of a book club and an online course, a MOOC provides a platform for a stimulating and interactive interest group to offer members. Advantages of MOOCs include location flexibility (members only need access to internet connection), price point (majority of MOOCs are offered free of charge), and schedule adaptability (classes offered 24/7 so they fit around your schedule). MOOCs are offered by major universities from around the world such as Harvard, Yale, University of Toronto, Queensland University, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausane,
etc.
Step by Step: Setting up a “Learn by MOOC" Interest Group

  1. [Group] Selects MOOC for study: Group member volunteers to lead next month’s discussion.
  2. [Individual] Registers with Institution providing the MOOC
  3. [Individual] Enrolls in MOOC
  4. [Individual] Independently studies online course materials including video and written materials. May also choose to complete quizzes and join online discussion boards
  5. [Group] In between meetings groups can use a closed Facebook page to post questions, comments, etc. Facebook can also be used to post possible MOOCs for study and track attendance at meetings.
  6. [Group] Members reconvene to discuss course materials in the context of their lives and experience.

Below are MOOCs being offered in course material that may be relevant to various CFUW initiatives:
Indigenous Canada: University of Alberta
Understanding Violence Against Women: Focus Learning
Women in Leadership, Inspiring Positive Change

Contributed by CFUW Oakville



March 2017

In this Issue:  


Dr. Vivian Brown Morton – Leadership for Changing Times CFUW President from 1958-1961
By: Nancy L. Renault

Maintaining a Healthy Charitable Trust 
By: Doris Mae Oulton

The 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project Update #6
By: Lynn Franklin

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 
  
These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW Member Resources website for use at any time. You can find them on the site HERE.
 
If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Robin Jackson, Executive Director at cfuwed@rogers.com

Dr. Vivian Brown Morton – Leadership for Changing Times
CFUW President from 1958-1961

 
The 1950s and early 1960s ushered in an era of social, political, cultural and economic changes in Canada and around the world. In terms of women’s right, it was a time of many “firsts,” with the appointment of the first female cabinet minister, the first federal female Ambassador and the first woman appointed to the Parole Board.
 
Dr. Vivian Brown Morton spearheaded the CFUW during these tumultuous times, making a solid contribution to the political landscape in Canada. In addition to serving as the 14th National President, Vivian was involved at every level of the organization over the years – she served with the local Saskatoon Club, was the Provincial Director for Saskatchewan (1957-1958), the National Membership Secretary (1946-1953), and attended two IFUW Triennials (London, 1953 and Paris, 1956).
 
Under her leadership, the CFUW made many notable contributions to the advancement of women and society at large. For example, scholarships presented from CFUW clubs across Canada increased from  $21,000 to $30,000. It was also during her tenure that CFUW submissions were presented directly to the Prime Minister for the first time. In a show of commitment to social justice, national unity and women’s rights, some of these initial submissions included a request for tax deductions for working women, the admittance of a larger number of tubercular Hungarians to Canada and support for the National Library and the CBC – issues that are all too familiar to us today.
 
Throughout her life, Vivian was active in her community and, along with her husband, Arthur, was passionate about history and culture. She was involved in the Historical Association of the University of Saskatchewan, the Saskatoon Arts and Crafts Society and the Handicrafts Committee of the Saskatchewan Arts Council. Her contribution to arts and culture earned her an honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of Saskatchewan in 1962. In addition, the Vivian Williams Morton and Arthur Silver Morton Memorial Travel Scholarship was created in her and her husband’s name by the Saskatchewan Arts and Crafts Society in recognition of their support.
 
If you would like to learn more about Dr. Vivian Brown Morton, you can read her full biography at http://www.fcfdu.org/whoweare/cfuw100thanniversary/pastpresidentsbiographies.aspx.
 
By Nancy L. Renault
Nancy is a Montreal-based translator and writer with an interest in community organizations and women’s issues.

Maintaining a Healthy Charitable Trust


Contributions to the Charitable Trust (CT) are critical to maintaining the ability of CFUW Charitable Trust to continue its important role in our Fellowships program. There are a number of ways member and Clubs contribute to this. We very much appreciate all of the help we have received over the years. Some of the ways you can assist us in maintaining a healthy Trust are your contributions to the Boutique at the Annual General Meeting (many thanks);  the lunch/breakfast at the AGM (please join us this year); purchasing our lovely celebration and Christmas cards (available at the AGM) ; Club contributions; and, of course, direct contributions on our website (http://cfuwcharitabletrust.ca/). We have an annual event at Shaw, this year a matinee of Me and My Girl  at the Shaw  Festival  on Thursday, April 27. Tickets are $65 with a $15 receipt for tax purposes. The proceeds are in support of the CFUW Charitable Trust post-graduate awards and fellowships. If interested contact annmce@sympatico.ca

We have been very fortunate that some Clubs, when they have had a change in circumstance, have made special arrangements with the CT.  In March 2015, the Education Council-Wolfville transferred the proceeds of their education fund to the CFUW Charitable Trust to establish a new award, the CFUW Aboriginal Women's Award (AWA).  
 
In reviewing our Charter (which we are recreating as Articles and Bylaws), we became very aware that it is important for us, and all Clubs, to determine the allocation of their assets upon dissolution. We all sincerely hope that there are no occasions where this clause is necessary, however, we would respectfully request that Clubs consider including the Charitable Trust in such arrangements.
 
Thank you for all your support in the past. Please be assured that the trustees are aware of the importance of the CFUWCT and of making careful and well informed decisions as we continue to raise money and administer funds to support the Fellowships and Awards Program of the Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW).

Prepared by Doris Mae Oulton, Chair of CFUW Charitable Trust


The 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project Update #6


$100,000 Goal - To celebrate the CFUW’s 100thAnniversary, the local, regional and national levels of CFUW have as their goal the provision of an additional $100,000 in scholarships and awards in 2019.

Over $60,000 Received - Donations received by the CFUW Charitable Trust for additional national awards in 2019 now total over $60,000

Over $30,000 Pledged – Many Clubs are planning to give additional local awards in 2019.  Most Clubs are still fundraising and drafting criteria; however, current estimates predict that total to be in excess of $30,000.

$450 Needed - The ‘Matching Gift Campaign’ which was announced at the St. Catharines AGM in June needs nine more $50 donations to achieve its goal of $10,000.  These contributions will be matched or effectively doubled up to the goal.  Let’s ‘wrap-up this gift campaign’ as soon as possible!

20 Base Donors - Some Clubs have wondered who is supplying the ‘matching’ funds for the ‘Matching Gift Campaign’.  The matching donors are CFUW members from across Canada who support the CFUW Fellowship Program and the CFUW Charitable Trust and who responded to a request to initiate the campaign by committing to a $250 donation.  Thanks for their generosity!

106 Clubs - At the AGM in 2019, all Clubs will be recognized publicly for their additional local awards and/or donations to the CFUW Trust for additional fellowships in our anniversary year.  To ensure that every Club that is participating is included, the CFUW’s 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project Committee is contacting all Clubs that have not previously reported.  In early February an email was sent to many Clubs requesting 100th Anniversary plans.  The results are still being tabulated, and it appears that while some Clubs are raising funds for the CFUW Charitable Trust for additional awards at the national level, many more are planning to give local awards.  This is exciting news!

If we missed your Club during our email campaign, please report your Club’s plans to the 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project Leader, Lynn Franklin, at lynn.franklin@sympatico.ca .


 

January 2017

In this Issue:  


CFUW Delegates to Attend United Nations Commission on Status of Women Meet-ings in New York City, March 2017
By: Cheryl Hayles, VP International Relations

CFUW’s  National Membership Committee
By: Dr. Madeline A. Kalbach, VP Membership

International Engagement; Follow Your Passion, Interrupt the Status Quo
By: Cheryl Hayles, VP International Relations
 

CFUW Charitable Trust: awarding fellowships to women pursuing post-graduate studies across the country.
By: Kathryn Wilkinson, VP Education

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 
  
These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW Member Resources website for use at any time. You can find them on the site HERE.
 
If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Robin Jackson, Executive Director at cfuwed@rogers.com

CFUW Delegates to Attend United Nations Commission on Status of Women Meetings in New York City, March 2017

 

This spring a 20 person delegation of the Canadian Federation of University Women will attend the annual conference at the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW61) in New York City taking place from March 13-24, 2017. The CSW is the principal global intergovernmental body exclusively dedicated to the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of women.

 

The discussion at this year’s session will primarily focus on… Read the full article here.

CFUW’s  National Membership Committee
 
The Membership Committee is responsible for directing the development of membership policies, procedures and strategies for recruitment and retention in CFUW. In addition, Membership adjudicates applications for several  annual CFUW Club awards, i.e., the Violence Against Women award, the Special Project award,  the New Members and Member Increase Awards and the Small Club Grants award. The committee also presents the awards at the AGM each year or in the case of the small club grants prior to the AGM.

Read the full article here.

CFUW Charitable Trust: Awarding Fellowships to Women Pursuing Post-Graduate Studies Across the Country.

As many of you are aware, the CFUW Charitable Trust is a separate entity from CFUW and, unlike CFUW National, the Trust also has charitable status with CRA so any donations made to the CT are eligible for a tax receipt.  Annually, the Charitable Trust awards over ninety thousand dollars to women pursuing post-graduate studies.  The CT now has its own website. 

Read the full article here.

International Engagement; Follow Your Passion, Interrupt the Status Quo

It is very encouraging to learn how our CFUW members are positively engaged in making a difference in the world! Our very own Kathryn Wilkinson, VP Education followed her life long passion and took her teaching skills on the road all the way to Tanzania to work with village girls to raise their level of education. This is a repeat trip for Kathryn to work on an initiative that is dear to her heart. Her testimonial introduces the reader to a world that seems so remote from Canadian sensibilities, yet we know the world is shrinking and it is possible to participate in reshaping outcomes for women and girls globally.

Read Kathryn's testimonial here.

November 2016

In this Issue:

 

The Charitable Trust- What it is and What it Does

By: Kathryn Wilkinson, Charitable Trust Trustee.

Announcing Five New CFUW Member Discounts
By: Elizabeth Whyte
Member Services Coordinator


Who are the CFUW National Alumnae and Do You Have One in Your Club?
By:Susan Murphy
Chair, CFUW National Alumnae
  

Reminder: GWI publication "inFocus"

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 
  
These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.
 
If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Robin Jackson, President at cfuwed@rogers.com

The Charitable Trust- What it is and What it Does


There is sometimes confusion about what the CFUW Charitable Trust is and what it does. This short article may answer some questions and more information is always available on the Charitable Trust website: www.cfuwcharitabletrust.ca.

CFUW has supported graduate study, literacy and creative arts through awards and fellowships since its founding in 1919 and the first CFUW Travelling Fellowship of $1000 was awarded in 1921 by the 12 clubs that then formed the federation.  

The term CFUW Charitable Trust is deceiving because the Charitable Trust (CT) is a separate entity from CFUW and has been since 1967 when it received a registered Ontario charity number.  The charitable number allows the CT to receive donations, manage the resulting funds, and issue charitable receipts for tax purposes.  In 1976, a further change in the rules governing charities allowed the CT to build a reserve fund for future awards and award increases. The CT now administers an investment portfolio of over one million dollars and annually awards over ninety thousand dollars to women pursuing post-graduate studies. 
Funds for the CT are raised in a number of ways. CFUW clubs, individual club members and non-members support the Trust with their donations and memorial gifts; the CT sells cards, holds an annual theatre trip and is supported by the CT Boutique at the CFUW AGM and the CT breakfast or lunch, also at the AGM.  

The funds are used for annual Fellowships, Awards and Grants for Canadian women doing advanced study and research in science, math, engineering, home economics, education, visual arts, music, humanities, and social sciences. The CT also supports the Library and Creative Arts awards that are awarded in alternate years to projects nominated by a CFUW Club. 

The administration of the Fellowships and Awards Program is managed by the Fellowships Program Manager of CFUW, Betty Dunlop, on behalf of the Charitable Trust.

The Trust continues the work and vision of the original twelve clubs believing that supporting women in higher education empowers women.

Kathryn Wilkinson,
Charitable Trust Trustee.

Announcing Five New CFUW Member Discounts


The Canadian Federation of University Women is pleased to bring you a wider range of discounts on products and services. We have heard from our members how much they value these discounts. Recently a member shared that “I took advantage of the CFUW Personal Insurance discount when it was first introduced. I was able to add my house to the policy and saved over $300 annually. Recently I had my home insurance policy evaluated and was told that the coverage I had for the amount I pay was truly the best the agent had seen.” (Loretta Mulligan)

Thanks to hearing such positive feedback from our members we have expanded the discounts offered for CFUW members. We now offer new discounts on products from: Lenovo, Avis, Budget, Intercall, and Novexco.

Lenovo: CFUW members are eligible to save up to 30% off the everyday public web price of Lenovo’s entire product line. Take advantage of great deals on everything you need for your office and home, including all laptops, tablets, desktops, all-in-ones, workstations, servers, and accessories. This includes savings on top products, such as the award-winning ThinkPad laptops and innovative multimode YOGA tablets.

CFUW members also receive free ground shipping on all web orders, monthly limited-time special offers, access to energy-efficient green technologies, and award-winning service and support. For more information and easy ordering, call 1-888-315-7408, ext. 5067 or visit www.lenovo.com/members.

Avis: CFUW members always receive up to 25% off your rental when you use AWD# D423500, plus enjoy additional offers like dollars off, a complimentary upgrade, or a free weekend day. With a complimentary membership in Avis Preferred®, you’ll travel better, save time and gain access to exclusive offers. Skip the counter and paperwork at many locations and go straight to your car. Visit avis.com/800members or call 1-800-331-1212 to make a reservation.

Budget: CFUW members always save up to 25% off Budget base rates with offer code (BCD) # D836600, plus get other great offers like dollars off, a complimentary upgrade, or a free weekend day. Plus with a complimentary membership in Budget Fastbreak, enjoy our fastest, easiest rental experience! Visit budget.com/800members or call 1-800-527-0700 to make a reservation.
 
Intercall: CFUW has partnered with West Unified Communications to provide members with special rates for audio and web conferencing through their InterCall service. Toll-free audio conferencing is priced at 3.5 cents per minute and web conferencing at 5 cents per minute. With this pricing you save up to 70% off the standard InterCall rate. To enroll, call 1-800-MEMBERS (800-636-2377) M-F from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. ET or click here to submit an application online.

Novexco: CFUW members save big with Novexco, the largest Canadian-owned national distributor of Office Products and Workplace Solutions in Canada. Get substantial savings to your business with a regular product list discounted up to 90% and additional online discounts off all other products. No delivery charges and no minimum order, next day delivery to most populated regions, a 30 day ‘no hassle’ return policy. Enroll here or contact wayne.mckenna@novexco.co or call 1-416-707-8951.

If you need any assistance in accessing these discounts please contact Elizabeth Whyte, Member Services Coordinator, at cfuwgen@rogers.com or by telephone at 1-888-220-9606.

Who are the CFUW National Alumnae and Do You Have One in Your Club? 

The CFUW National Alumnae is a group of over 60 past CFUW national leaders, from the Board of Directors, Regional Directors, Committee Chairs and others who remain active in and committed to CFUW.   Many organizations and institutions have alumnae who are cheerleaders and supporters and CFUW is no different.  The CFUW National Alumnae has been active for a number of years and its numbers are growing as our national leadership changes from biennium to biennium. 
 
The Alumnae mandate, in cooperation with the Board and Regional Directors, is to volunteer, mentor, act as ambassadors, provide feedback and viewpoints, and support current initiatives of CFUW such as the 100th Anniversary Committee.   The group has an annual meeting at national AGMs for those who are in attendance, and members keep in touch by email newsletters and updates throughout the year. 
 
These women have many years of experience and background in CFUW, they have attended innumerable regional, national and international meetings,  volunteered their time and expertise at each of those levels and gained a great deal of knowledge through those experiences.  A number of them are helping now in their home clubs as committee members, chairs, and even club Presidents when the need has arisen.   They have stepped up when called upon to maintain the sustainability of their clubs.    If you need some assistance,  please just ask one of them. 
 
Susan Murphy
Chair, CFUW National Alumnae         

Reminder

Some of you may subscribe to the GWI Update which is GWI’s external communication document. GWI has a publication for members only; “inFocus”. Here is the link to subscribe for the GWI inFocus: http://bit.ly/2fv5HGd. The information is also available in the members corner here: http://www.graduatewomen.org/members-login/gwi-material/infocus/.  Enjoy following all the initiatives of GWI and our sister organizations activities.

Copyright © *|2016|* *|Canadian Federation of University Women|*, All rights reserved.

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October 2016

In this Issue:  

 

Mentorship Program- Extension of Deadline
By: Cheryl Hayles
V.P. International Relations

Margaret ‘Madge’ Watt Plaque Unveiling
By: Tracey Otto & Audrey Thomas

Library Award 2016 Presentation
By: Tracey Otto, Chair,  Library and Creative Arts Committee
 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 
  
These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.
 
If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Robin Jackson, President at cfuwed@rogers.com

Mentorship Program- Extension of Deadline
 

Mentorship, Your Future Depends on It
 

We are very pleased to offer the CFUW Mentorship Program for the second year to our members.  The program was established in 2015 to promote cooperation, build networks, offer support and deepen understanding of women’s empowerment pathways. The symbiotic relationship between Mentor and Mentee encourages and enables women to apply their knowledge and skills in leadership and decision-making in the political arena, organizational leadership and the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) fields.

 

-     Are you a recent graduate entering the work force?

-     Would you like help in preparing for an interview, assistance with an application process?

-     Are you interested in a political career and need help getting started?

-     Are you entering a 'non-traditional' career and would like some guidance?

If any of the above statements resonates with you, we encourage you to apply for a CFUW Mentor. Our Mentors are committed to supporting other women in reaching their full potential.

 

One of our 2015 Mentors when asked what she thought of the Mentorship Program said,

“In my opinion, the Mentor/Mentee programme is a valuable resource for both Mentors and Mentees and should be continued. It has been an excellent experience for me as a Mentor. I believe we both benefited from the pilot programme. I would like to see it continue”.

 

Aspiring women have the opportunity to request a CFUW Mentor in any of the designated areas.  Our Mentors give back in ways that are specific to the needs of the Mentee.  If you are interested in joining as a Mentor or Mentee in STEAM, Politics or Organizational Leadership please contact Robin Jackson, cfuwed@rogers.com, at the national office with your request.  To facilitate the process of matching Mentors and Mentees please provide the following information in your communication by October 31, 2016. Matches will be made and communicated in early November.

 

Mentor 

Name:_________  Club:______  Province:_______ or Country:_______

Indicate area of interest (Politics, STEAM, Organizational Leadership)  

Your Curriculum Vitae including your contact information such as Email:_____  Telephone #:____________  

Have you previously participated as a mentor in another organization?  Yes___ No___

 

Mentee  

Name:_________  Club:______ Province:________ or Country:_______ 

Indicate area of interest (Politics, STEAM, Organizational Leadership)  

Email:_____  Telephone #:____________

 

We are very appreciative of our current Mentors for their leadership in working with our Mentees, to indicate your interest in continuing in the program please send a confirmation to Robin Jackson by October 31, 2016.  

 

Cheryl Hayles

VP International Relations

 

Margaret ‘Madge’ Watt Plaque Unveiling
 

On September 7th Audrey Thomas, Paddy McGowan, Susan Shepherd, and myself attended the unveiling of a plaque commemorating Margaret ‘Madge’ Watt, who was designated as a Person of National Historical Significance in 2007. The event took place at the Metchosin Municipal Hall, with Parks Canada installing the plaque. Madge is best known for being a founder of both the Women’s Institute and the Association of Country Women of the World. Her inspiration for founding the ACWW was the work she did with the Women’s Institute on Vancouver Island, specifically Metchosin. These organizations promote women, family, and communities with the goal of empowering women to make a difference. They concentrate on international initiatives and rural communities. Madge holds a special place in CFUW Victoria’s heart because she was our second Club President, 1911-1912.
 
There were more than 125 people at the event. We set everything up outside, but the rain decided we should be indoors. So the chairs, audio equipment, flags, and refreshments were promptly relocated inside the Counsel Chambers. There were a number of speakers; including the International President of the ACWW (arriving from the UK, on her way home to Australia) and Madge’s great niece, who travelled from Australia for the unveiling. After the speeches, we headed outside, braving the rain, to watch the unveiling of the plaque.
 
The event was a great opportunity to reconnect with members of the Women’s Institute and to meet new people who share the same vision as CFUW.
 
Prepared by: Tracey Otto & Audrey Thomas
 
(in the photo left to right: Audrey Thomas, Paddy McGowan, Tracey Otto. Susan Shepherd isn’t in the photo)

Library Award 2016 Presentation

The Library and Creative Arts Committee is responsible for two awards-the Creative Arts Award and the Library Award-and they are presented on a biennial basis. Each Award is $4,000.00 and is funded by the Charitable Trust. In 2016 the Library Award was offered and the committee received nine applications from across Canada. Once the success applicant was chosen, the committee’s decision was sent to the CFUW Board, and then announced at the National AGM in St Catharines.
 
On June 27 I had the honour of presenting the 2016 Library Award, on behalf of the Library and Creative Arts Committee, to the Shelldale Better Beginnings, Better Futures organization in Guelph Ontario. Director of Programming Lorri Sauve and Program Coordinator Kristin Hohendal accepted the Award in front of colleagues, clients, and the media. Their winning proposal is a family literacy project, which utilizes children’s books published in multiple languages to engage and encourage members of families new to Canada to learn English and connect with members of their community.
 
One of the many reasons Shelldale’s proposal was chosen is because it is a sustainable project. Their goals are realistic and achievable, while potentially making a huge impact on the lives of members in the community they serve. Our decision was reaffirmed after touring the facilities and meeting the staff, volunteers, and clients. They are doing incredible work!
 
We look forward to receiving applications for the Creative Arts Award, which will open January 1st 2017.
 
 Prepared by Tracey Otto
Chair,  Library and Creative Arts Committee

Copyright © *|2016|* *|Canadian Federation of University Women|*, All rights reserved.

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October 19, 2015

 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use in their newsletter or website. 

  

These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW Member Resources website for use at any time.

 

If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Doris Mae Oulton, President at cfuwpres@gmail.com.

Women's History Month

 

In the excitement of the election, it's easy to forget that October is Women's History thanks to women being named "persons" on October 18, 1929.

 

The theme this year is Her Story, Our Story: Celebrating Canadian Women.  Information about this and future themes can be found at

www.swc-cfc.gc.ca

   

In this Issue:  

 

CFUW Trailblazers: Women Who Knew How to Roar

Prepared by Tara Fischer, Advocacy Coordinator and Teri Shaw, VP Advocacy

 

The Governor General's Awards in Commemoration of the Persons Case

 

Suffragettes in Canada were actually Suffrigists

By: Teri Shaw, VP Advocacy


CFUW Trailblazers: Women Who Knew How to Roar  

Tara Fisher, Advocacy Coordinator and Teri Shaw, VP Advocacy (Republished from October 17, 2014)

 

To mark Women's History Month in Canada, CFUW is honouring some of the trailblazers that were once members of our organization.

 

Mabel Chown (Mrs. Douglas F. Thom) was 24 when she became President of the first University Women's Club, in Toronto, in 1903.  She became President of the National organization in 1931 until 1934.  During her tenure, CFUW joined others to fight the dismissal of married women from the staff of the University of Toronto.

 

Dr. Ann Augusta Stowe-Gullen (1857 - 1943), one of the first members of the University Women's Club Toronto, is known for being the first woman to graduate from a Canadian medical school (Faculty of Medicine at Victoria University, Toronto) in 1883. Her advocacy work led to the establishment of the Ontario Medical College for Women.

  

Dr. Alice E. Wilson (1881 - 1964) was one of the first recipients of a CFUW scholarship at the age of 44, which opened the door to a long and distinguished career as the first woman to hold a professional position with the Geological Survey of Canada and to be appointed Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1938.  Recognizing the importance of the CFUW scholarship/fellowship program, Dr. Wilson left a bequest to the organization in 1964, establishing the Dr. Alice E. Wilson Awards. The awards are given to four women annually.

 

Dr. Elizabeth Bagshaw (1881 - 1982) was one of Canada's first female doctors and the medical director of the first (illegal) birth control clinic in Canada despite intense criticism from the medical and religious communities. She served  

Dr. Elizabeth Bagshshaw

 as the clinic's medical director for over 30 years pioneering areas of family medicine that were not widely practiced at the time. Dr. Bagshaw was a member of the University Women's Club of Hamilton.

 

Helen Alice Kinnear, Q.C. (1894 - 1970), a former member of the University Women's Club of Toronto, was the first federally appointed woman judge in Canada.

 

Charlotte Elizabeth Whitton, O.C., C.B.E. (1896 - 1975) was a member of the University Women's Club in Ottawa, a feminist, and the first woman mayor of Ottawa (and a major city in Canada), serving from 1951 to 1956 and again from 1960 to 1964.

 

The Honourable Muriel McQueen Fergusson, P.C. O.C. Q.C. (1899 - 1997), a former member of CFUW Ottawa, was the first woman Speaker of the Senate from1972 to 1974, and the first woman deputy mayor of Ottawa in 1953.

 

Phyllis Gregory Ross, O.C., C.B.E. (1903 - 1988) was a Canadian economist and the first woman to serve as a Chancellor in the Commonwealth of Nations. She was a member and President of the University Women's Club in Ottawa.

 

Winona Grace MacInnis, O.C., O.B.C.  (1905 - 1991), a former member of University Women's Clubs of Ottawa and Vancouver, was the first woman from British Columbia to be elected to the House of Commons.

 

Helen Battles Sawyer Hogg, C.C. (1905 - 1993),a former member of the University Women's Club on Toronto,was an astronomer, the first female president of several astronomical organizations, and the first woman to be appointed to the physical sciences division of the Royal Society of Canada.

 

Dr. Jessie Gray (1910 - 1978) was known as Canada's "first lady of surgery", and one of the four leading cancer surgeons in North America at the time. She was a member of the University Women's Club of Toronto, and earned an impressive 

Dr. Jessie Gray

succession of firsts: first woman gold medalist in medicine at U of T (1934); first woman to obtain the master of surgery degree (1939); first woman resident surgeon at the Toronto General Hospital; first woman fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons (Canada, 1941); first woman member of the Central Surgical Society of North America; and first woman elected to the Science Council of Canada (1966).

 

The Hon. Pauline Mills McGibbon, C.C., O. Ont, (1910 - 2001) was a member of the University Women's Club of Toronto, and served as the 22nd Lieutenant Governor of Ontario from 1974 to 1980. In addition to being the first woman to occupy this position, she was the first woman to serve as a vice regal representative.

 

Blanche Margaret Meagher, O.C. (1911 - 1999) was a Canadian diplomat and in 1958 was appointed as Canada's first woman ambassador. She was a member of the University Women's Club of Halifax and served as Ambassador to Israel, Austria and Sweden.

 

Laura Sabia, O.C. (1916-1996) was President of CFUW when she called together Canadian women's organizations in 1967 to put pressure on the Pearson government to appoint a Royal Commission on the Status of Women.  This group became known as the Committee for the Equality of Women (CEW) with Sabia as the chair.  After an annoying meeting in Ottawa with no results, and an equally annoying newspaper interview forcing Laura Sabia to threaten a march on Parliament HIll. This resulted in the headline "A Million Women to March on Ottawa", and three days later Pearson appointed the Commission. Sabia became the first President of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women, the successor to CEW.


Marie-Claire Kirkland-Casgrain, C.M., C.Q. is a Quebec lawyer, judge, politician and former member of CFUW Montreal. She was the first woman elected to the Legislative Assembly of Quebec, the first woman appointed a Cabinet minister in Quebec, the first woman appointed acting premier, and the first woman judge to serve in the Quebec Provincial Court.


As part of CFUW's celebration of its 100th Anniversary in 2019, the History Committee has writers preparing extensive biographies of all CFUW Past Presidents who have served at the national level since 1919. Watch for an announcement at AGM 2016.

The Governor General's Awards in Commemoration of the Persons Case 


In 1929, five women from Alberta, Henrietta Edwards, Emily Murphy, Nellie McClung, Irene Parlby, and Louise McKinney won the right to be recognized as persons by the Privy Council of Great Britain. The Privy Council ruled "that the exclusion of women from all public offices is a relic of days more barbarous than ours". The Lord Chancellor wrote "to those who ask why the word ["person"] should include females, the obvious answer is why should it not."

 

 This ruling made women eligible for appointment to the Senate, and in the following year, Cairine Wilson was sworn in as a Senator. 

 

The Governor General's Awards in Commemoration of the Persons Case were established in 1979, by the Government of Canada, with the support of then-Governor General the Right Honourable Edward Schreyer, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of this historic decision.

 

At time of writing the 2015 honourees had not been announced - see http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/commemoration/gg/index-en.html for more information.

Suffragettes in Canada were actually Suffrigists

Teri Shaw

VP Advocacy


At the end of October, a film, Suffragette, starring Cary Mulligan and Meryl Streep, opens in Canada.  It is the story of the women's suffrage movement in the United Kingdom. Exciting, terrifying, but here in Canada it was quite different.

 

The suffragette movement in Canada was not the exciting, harrowing experience as it was in Great Britain and the United States.  It was typically Canadian - quiet and very determined.  

 

In the 1870's the women's suffrage movement that had been bubbling in the United States and Great Britain became important in Canada. Dr. Emily Howard Stowe and her daughter Dr. Augusta Stowe-Gullen created the Toronto Women's Literary Club in 1876 (later became The Dominion Woman's Enfranchisement Association and then the Canadian Suffrage Association). Dr. Stowe-Gullen would much later, at the turn of the century, become one of the first members of the University Women's Club of Toronto, the first club founded in 1903.  

 

At the same time in 1874, one of the more formidable forces for suffrage was created - the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).  This would grow to become the largest non-denominational women's organization in Canada. This group felt that only women's suffrage would bring about prohibition, hence their strong support for women's right to vote.

 

In 1884, unmarried women or widows were allowed to vote in Ontario municipalities, but not married women who were not considered "persons".  

 

Sir John A. MacDonald introduced three bills in Parliament to allow unmarried women and widows to vote.  All were defeated, and ultimately a change in the Electoral Act made this a provincial issue - a very early version of downloading of responsibilities! 

 

In 1887 in Manitoba all women were allowed in municipal elections, and the next barrier to fall were school board elections when female rate-payers were allowed to vote in most of the provinces.  But in 1907 Manitoba revoked women's right to vote in municipal elections.

 

In the early years of the last century, a number of women, like Nellie McClung, Agnes Macphail and Alice Amelia Chown were becoming strong, vocal feminists.  Chown was the founding member of the Toronto Equal Franchise League, a break away group from the Toronto Women's Suffrage Association.  Women's organizations were growing.  Adelaide Hoodless started the Women's Institute, the National Council of Women had been formed, the Political Equality League of Vancouver and Victoria started, as well as the early university women's clubs.  Mabel Chown, niece of Alice Amelia Chown, was the first President of the first University Women's Club in Toronto in 1903, and helped found another in Regina in 1915.

 

Over the next period of time a number of bills concerning suffrage were proposed in all the provinces, and were defeated. 

 

The "fight" continued. In Manitoba, in January 1914 in response to their Premier who opposed the women's right to vote, Nellie McClung and the Political Equality League and their supporters staged a play, "The Women's Parliament", a satire about the dangers of giving men the vote. The play received national attention, even going 'on tour'. 

 

Yet it would take the defeat of that government in 1915 to secure the vote.

 

On January 28, 1916 Manitoba became the first province to give the vote to women in provincial elections, followed by Saskatchewan and Alberta that same year, and British Columbia and Ontario the next in 1917.

 

The impact of women's work during the war was strongly felt.  In 1918 enfranchisement finally happened for federal election for some women - 21, not alien-born, met the property requirements where they lived. This did exclude Asian and First Nations women. This wasn't fixed until 1948 and 1960 respectively! 

 

In 1918 the vote came in Nova Scotia, 1919 in New Brunswick, 1922 in Prince Edward Island.  It was not until 1940 that women gained to right to vote in Quebec provincial elections.

 

The first federal election when women were both allowed to vote and to run for office was in 1921.  Agnes MacPhail became the first female MP.  And we were still not considered "persons" under the law at this time.  This did not happen until 1929 with the intervention of the Privy Council in England.

 

The 40-year fight for the franchise was long and frustrating, but not without interesting bed-fellows - Sir John A. MacDonald, the Women's Temperance Union, labour councils and unions, Ontario municipalities, National Council of Women, and many women's suffrage organizations across the country.

FALL ADVOCACY PACKAGE

 


Look for the Fall Advocacy Package coming out after the election, complete with congratulatory notes for your Member of Parliament, template letters about the newly adopted resolutions plus other 


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Press Agency


April 2015

 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 

  

These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.

 

If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Doris Mae Oulton, President at  cfuwpres@gmail.com

    

     In this Issue:  


  • Addressing Violence Against Women and Girls  
    by Karen Dunnett, VP Membership and Tara Fisher, Advocacy Coordinator
  • Letter from Julia Whidden, a First Year Student Member of CFUW

 

Addressing Violence Against Women and Girls

 by Karen Dunnett, VP Membership and Tara Fisher, Advocacy Coordinator

 

 

Since launching the National Initiative on Violence against Women and Girls in 2013, Clubs have enthusiastically embraced the initiative. We have featured many of the activities in The Communicator last May and on the website(http://www.cfuw.org/en-ca/clubsandcouncils/nationalinitiativeclubactivities.aspx).

 

Again this year, we will highlight the work done and will be presenting VAW awards at the AGM. Along with the Clubs, National has worked on the issue as well.

 

CFUW National is working closely with the Canadian Network of Women Shelters and Transition Houses, the YWCA Canada and others involved in the VAW sector to accomplish a number of goals:

 

1)    Raise public awareness about the issue in the lead up to the federal election. Through the Alliance for Women's Rights and the Up for Debate campaign, we are asking political parties to incorporate a strong policy response in their election platforms and commit to a federal leaders' debate on issues identified by women, particularly violence against women.

 

2)    Encourage decisions makers to develop a more comprehensive policy response to end violence against women and girls. With a number of partners, CFUW contributed to a Blueprint for a National Action Plan on Violence against Women and Girls, which was just released late February 2015.

 

3)    Urge the Government of Canada to take stronger action to address the shocking number of Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women and Girls.With the support of Clubs, CFUW collectively sent over 100 letters to politicians about this tragedy following the murder of Tina Fontaine.

 

Also National has:

  • with other advocates, urged the Government of Canada to implement a legal framework similar to the Nordic model to help address the violence prostituted women and girls experience,
  • participated in the Government's consultation with the public, submitting a brief to House of Commons Justice and Human Rights committee
  • worked with other organizations like the Native Women's Association of Canada and the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies, sending letters to Ministers
  • published an Op-ed in the Winnipeg Free Press and a  letter to the editor in the Globe and Mail,
  • highlighted how violence against women impacts women's vulnerability to violence and affects their economic well-being in our submission to the House of Commons Status of Women Committee, a study on Women's Economic Prosperity,
  • continued to develop tools for Clubs to use during the 16 Days of Activism to End Gender Violence, and particularly on December 6, the National Day of Action of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women.

As we approach the end of the second year with the prevention of violence against women as our national initiative, we can be proud of the work that has been done both at the Club and National level. We have developed a certain momentum and awareness within CFUW, in the communities supporting this work and in the general public. In conversations with Club members, National Office, the Advocacy and the Membership Committees, there is a strong feeling that we need to continue our involvement on this important issue, perhaps making it a pillar of the work that we do. During the Town Hall session on Membership at the AGM, we will discuss the ways we can continue our work on this issue. 

 

Letter from Julia Whidden,  a First Year 

Student Member of CFUW

 

 

Press Agency


March 2015

 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 

  

These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.

 

If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Doris Mae Oulton, President at  cfuwpres@gmail.com.

    

     In this Issue:  


  • The Power of Women Working to Create Scholarships  
    by Kathryn Wilkinson, CFUW Mississauga
  • The Success of Small Club Grants
    by Karen Dunnett, VP Membership
  • A Renewal Process: CFUW Belleville
    by Lenore Begley, President CFUW, Belleville and District

 

The Power of Women Working to Create Scholarships

 by Kathryn Wilkinson, CFUW Mississauga

 

 

Across Canada, CFUW Clubs and members contribute over a million dollars annually to scholarships and fellowships and in 2019, in celebration of our 100th anniversary, the goal is to add an additional $100,000.  Our scholarship programs demonstrate the commitment that CFUW members make to empowering women and girls through education.  I would like to share the scholarship program and initiatives in Mississauga and our plan for 2019.


 Mississauga is Canada's sixth largest city but lives in the shadow of Toronto and, for much of its history, modern Mississauga was a series of small, independent communities in Peel County, each with a distinct character.  CFUW Mississauga began in 1953 in Port Credit, the most southern of the villages and became CFUW Mississauga in 1970.  Mississauga has a university, technically a campus of U of T, and a satellite campus of Sheridan College.  CFUW members were involved with the university from its inception and annually sponsor a renewable four year scholarship for a first year student.  We also sponsor a student at Sheridan College and award four scholarships of $2000 each to four outstanding Mississauga high school graduates.  But our most recent and most interesting project has been fundraising for the Charitable Trust.

 

The villages of Peel County had a long history well before the city of Mississauga.  A few years ago, one of our members returned from the AGM excited about the prospect of raising money for the Charitable Trust and thus supporting post-graduate studies.  From her enthusiasm grew 'our book':  Extraordinary Lives: Inspiring Women of Peel.  The book showcases the lives of 36 women over a 200 year period.  They represent the arts, sports, technology, social justice, politics, environment, and business - all facets of life.  The book production involved many members of our Club as writers, researchers, editors, fundraisers.  We published the book through funds raised and all proceeds have been directed towards the work of the Charitable Trust. In September 2012, we donated $3000 which was used to support the CFUW Creative Arts award that allowed Anna Pidgorna, a composer and media arts student to participate in a creative residency at the Banff Centre.   In the spring of 2013 $10,000 was given to the Charitable Trust: half was used to increase the trust fund and half allowed the CFUW Fellowship program to give an additional scholarship in 2014.  In January 2015, Lynn Franklin, Project Leader of the 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project was invited to our general meeting where we presented Lynn with a cheque for $6200.

 

This is CFUW Mississauga's first contribution to the 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project.   We still have books to sell (you can check our website!) and all proceeds will go towards the 100th Anniversary Scholarship fund.   

The Success of Small Club Grants

by Karen Dunnett, VP Membership
 

 

Three years ago, CFUW started to give small Club grants to support smaller Clubs attending the national AGM. Many small Clubs have never attended a national AGM and are isolated from the fellowship and 'bigger picture' of CFUW. These grants were seen as a way of connecting them to the rest of us. This year, like in others, their reports reaffirm that attending an AGM fulfils these goals. Again and again words of gratitude and reinvigoration are predominant ones in the reports that the grant recipients send.


 Their words also tell much more:

... I feel I can best express my appreciation [by telling how]... the conference made an impact on myself and could influence the future of our Club. "So what is CFUW?" I was asked on the plane to the conference. Now I have my 'elevator pitch' for the organization ready. I think by using the summarized information on the business card foldout from the Conference our Club members may have their own elevator pitch at the ready, too.

 

[Experiencing] the energy and enthusiasm this gathering generates among CFUW members, I strongly recommend [our Club] makes the cost of registration to National part of our annual budget planning for our President or a Delegate. After my first exposure to a CFUW National Convention, I'll be in QC for sure!

 

The Charitable Trust breakfast is so uplifting in that we can really see what a difference the scholarships make in helping recipients achieve advanced education.  We have a recipient of a CT scholarship in our area and she is coming to our Club to speak to us in November.


 I certainly took advantage of all opportunities to network with as many people as possible. It is clear that most Clubs, urban and rural, small and large, are facing similar challenges. And it is enlightening to hear how they deal with these challenges. If I had to pick one word to describe the weekend, it would be "sharing".

 

Attending a CFUW National Conference adds a whole new face to CFUW.  It is fine to hear that CFUW National promotes Women's Issues or that the IFUW sits on various committees and pursues various causes but, until you see the organization in action, it is hard to visualize the dedication of our leaders and executive members.


 ... The extent to which Clubs and individual members across Canada participate in the decision making process ...stood out in my mind.


 Without this reinforcement it is too easy at Club level to concentrate only on our local issues and lose sight of the broader picture.


 I hope that we, as a Club, will tap into the resources that are available for membership recruitment and retention, for carrying out more effective advocacy, and for making better use of partnerships within our community.

 

The enthusiasm of the attendees exemplified the new theme: The Power of Women Working Together.

 

The value of participating in a CFUW Conference and AGM will be presented via our website, newsletter and verbally to share the wealth that this opportunity provided to me.

 

The level of energy and passion that members exhibit for their Clubs, while sharing their experiences, is remarkable. New opportunities arose as I listened and thought 'there is a new concept that we could try with our Club'. The many ideas we gain increases our potential to have a successful Club.

 

Note: Nine Clubs - more than usual - were provided funds to attend the AGM. The extra funding came from the generous donations of attendees. They were given the opportunity to support the attendance of small Clubs on the 2014 AGM registration.

A Renewal Process: CFUW Belleville

by Lenore Begley, President CFUW, Belleville and District

 


The renewal process of CFUW Belleville and District grew out of a need identified in 2013 to reinvent its annual fundraiser. Belleville and District has a proud and longstanding tradition of reinvesting in the community in the form of scholarships and bursaries. For 15 years, our Club has run a successful garden tour, the proceeds of which fill the coffers of the Scholarship fund. Some members of the organizing committee of the garden tour had been involved for many years. By 2013, after running the most financially successful tour to date, they had come to the end of their desire to contribute in this way. It was time to do things differently and to have other people involved.

 

A one-time endowment provided funds for Club development. This became the seed money for a dialogue that began as a re-branding initiative and morphed into a larger examination of our Club, our members, our purpose and our plans for the future. 

 

Over the course of Club wide consultations, facilitated by United Way Director of Community Engagement, Brandi Hodge, we emerged with a report in three parts: Capturing the proposed mission, vision, values for CFUW Belleville and District (Draft of Stakeholder communication tools), Outline of possible considerations for the future of the CFUW-Belleville and District, and Thoughts and Ideas of the ad- hoc group regarding fundraising.

 

A committee has been established to make recommendations to the Club on our purpose and future directions. This set of recommendations will come forward in the fall of 2015. The recommendations on fundraising will be presented in April 2015. At the time of writing, the garden tour continues to be the principal fundraiser, however the renewal process has identified a number of other options that the Club will assess for implementation next year and beyond. 

 

While not every member took part in the consultation, there was very good representation from the membership. They appreciated the opportunity to provide their input. It has been a very useful series of conversations amongst our members and the results will help to set the directions for the future.

 

In closing, I offer a reworked quote by Winston Churchill. If we open a dialogue between the past and the present, we shall find that we have found the future.  That is what we hope to do with our Renewal dialogues.




February 2015


 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 

  

These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.

 

If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Doris Mae Oulton, President at  cfuwpres@gmail.com.


    

     In this Issue:  

  • Turning the Tide on Educational Opportunity for Aboriginal Children Brenda Shanahan and Liette Michaud, Quebec Council of University Women's Clubs
  • Increasing Membership While Supporting Career Development and Networking!
    Brenda Canitz, President CFUW Victoria

 

Turning the Tide on Educational Opportunity for Aboriginal Children 

Prepared by Brenda Shanahan and Liette Michaud, Quebec Council of University Women's Clubs
 

 

As members of the Quebec Council of University Women's Clubs we have long been distressed by news stories describing Third World conditions on Canadian reserves. Two years ago we decided to reach out to First Nations women to see how we could help.  The question was "how to do so in a respectful and productive manner when, we readily admitted amongst ourselves, we were so ill-informed about not only First Nations history but our own colonial past?" 

 

We first invited history professor Dr. Jean Manore of Bishop's University to our Spring 2013 Council meeting to talk to us about the "Idle No More" movement and to explain the various treaties in existence in Canada and specifically in Quebec. Members of our executive had earlier participated in the 2012 Truth and Reconciliation hearings in Montreal and later joined the advocacy organization "Les Femmes autochtones du Québec /Quebec Native Women (affiliated with the Native Women's Association of Canada) as friends as well as maintaining active Facebook contact with members of "Idle No More".

 

We next held a full day Educational Forum in October 2013 with invited speakers from First Nations groups as well as the provincial government.  It was now time for action.  We formed a Committee to investigate a partnership with a school in an Indigenous community. Our now established relationships helped us to quickly identify a community that was receptive to our initiative. In a face to face meeting with a local community leader, we learned that completing and obtaining a basic High School Diploma (DES) was still a challenge for youth on the isolated reserve. Furthermore, with no funding available for Adult Education, even vocational training is difficult to obtain for motivated young adults. We hope to address these and other needs by forging friendships with educators, parents and students during our next visit to the reserve in early 2015 and working collaboratively on a suitable project.

 

In the meantime, we are delighted to report that two Quebec Clubs have already undertaken local initiatives. L'AFDU in Québec City donates bursaries to women studying at a Vocational Training Centre in Wendake as well as providing a bursary to an Indigenous woman pursuing studies at Laval University. The Sherbrooke and District Club has partnered with Champlain College in Lennoxville to provide meal tickets and other necessities for Indigenous students from the Gaspé region.

 

Let us do our utmost to make 2015 the year the tide turns in favour of fully funded educational opportunity for all indigenous children and youth in Canada.

Increasing Membership while Supporting 

Career Development and Networking!

by Brenda Canitz, President CFUW Victoria


 

Having a resolution proposed, discussed in Clubs across the country and adopted at the National AGM is the first step in any advocacy project involving CFUW.  Adopted resolutions are the bedrock of our policy. Without this policy, CFUW cannot make any comments concerning public policy.

 

This process also occurs within the Councils and the Clubs.  If there is an issue that is local or provincial, resolutions can be passed at these levels as well.  All that is asked is that they do not contravene other policy or our purpose.

 

At all levels, we use adopted resolutions in four ways: as a tool for public awareness, to proactively express our concerns, to create partnerships and coalitions with like-minded organizations, and to react to issues and governments' agendas.

 

The resolution process itself acts as a public awareness tool by bringing an issue to the attention of CFUW members across the country, and once the resolution is adopted, all levels of CFUW - Clubs, Councils and National - are able to hold public meetings and forums, write articles and op-eds - bringing an awareness to the cause or concern.

 

Using both the newly adopted resolutions, as well as our bank of policies as found in the CFUW Policy Book, we are able to be proactive in our advocacy, that is, expressing our concerns to governments in order to get the issue on their agenda.  We do this through letters, meetings and briefs, as well continually attempting to bring issues to the attention of both our members and the public. 

 

We do encourage proposers to continue their advocacy with the assistance of the National Office and Board.

 

Again with the backing of our policies, we are able to create partnerships, both nationally and within the community, and coalitions, linking with other organizations to achieve that common goal. This then extends our influence and assists with our work.

 

Reacting to the government's agenda, or to problems within our communities, is the most frequent use of adopted resolutions.  Most of the time these are older adopted resolutions found in the Policy Book.  When an issue is "hot", when there is either a plan of action or legislation, when there is a problem to be solved, governments, decision-makers may be prepared to listen to our input. It is here that Clubs and Councils take on campaigns - BC Council with child poverty, CFUW Stratford with public transportation.

 

For many Clubs, the resolution is the first step in an advocacy campaign, going through all the stages of public awareness, pro-active, partnerships and reactive - UWC Vancouver with prostitution, Jeanne Sarson and Linda MacDonald (now of CFUW Truro) with non-state torture, UWC Montreal Inc. with financial literacy, CFUW Oakville with mental health.

 

As everything within public policy must be seen through a "political" lens, our comments are certainly not always heeded, but one never knows when that tipping point occurs, when we do actually push people to do the right thing.  We are a voice of the informed voter.  We just have to remind governments of that - constantly!


Press Agency


January 2015


 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 

  

These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.

 

If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Doris Mae Oulton, President at  cfuwpres@gmail.com.


    

     In this Issue:  

  • Did You Know...?
     
  • Study and Interest Groups - "Icing on the Cake"    Dianne Rummery, CFUW Ottawa
  • Resolutions 
     Eleanor Scarth, CFUW Resolutions Chair
  • Using CFUW Adopted Resolutions to Influence Public Policy
     Teri Shaw, VP Advocacy

 

Did You Know. . .?


  • that there are more than 600 aboriginal communities in Canada
  • that there are approximately 65 aboriginal ethnic groups with almost as many languages (source: http://www.slmc.uottawa.ca/?q=native_peoples_languages)
  • that a National Roundtable concerning the murdered and missing women is to be held in Ottawa on February 27, 2015 

Study and Interest Groups - "Icing on the Cake" by Dianne Rummery, CFUW Ottawa 

 

Study and Interest Groups are the "icing on the cake" for many Clubs, the fun or study units that often attract new members to CFUW.   

 

These groups come in many forms reflecting the interests and enthusiasms of the members:  people may come together to study Canadiana or international affairs or classical music or to advocate for a compelling cause.  Bridge and mahjong groups, dining out or in and theatre or travel groups; book groups and language groups are formed.  Hikers, bikers, skiers, skaters and snowshoers can all form groups under the umbrella of the Club.

 

A good start to forming a new group is for the person with the enthusiasm to gather kindred souls and work out how their unit would function.  What outings or speakers or facilities would be available to augment the group?  Once the idea has taken form, talk to the executive of your Club with your plan.  Once the new group has been approved, ask if you can speak about it during a Club meeting, write a piece for the Club newsletter and talk to members you know.  The best time to begin is usually in the fall as activities begin and members are deciding how they will be involved for the coming year. 

 

University Women Helping Afghan Women, an Ottawa group formed to advocate for a compelling cause, is an outstanding example in just four years.  After the Ottawa AGM in 2010 where the featured speaker was Afghan human rights activist and physician, Dr. Sima Samar, opened our minds and hearts to the plight of women in her country the group was developed.  UWHAW brings public attention to the gains strong resilient Afghan women have made. It also funds tuition for ten women students at the Gawharshad Institute of Higher Learning where classes are co-ed and human rights are emphasized. The first ten of the UWHAW girls graduate this December.  This group has 'legs' and last year leader Hally Siddons presented a seminar and workshop at the IFUW conference in Istanbul, spoke at a Parallel Session at the UN in March, at Women Graduates USA in Salt Lake City in September, recently at the Kanata Club, and will run a workshop at the this year's AGM in Quebec City.  Having a passionate and sustaining leader like Hally certainly contributes hugely to the success of UWHAW.

Many members of other Clubs have such strong enthusiasms and forming a study or interest group is an outstanding and fulfilling way to pursue them.  

Resolutions

Eleanor Scarth, CFUW Resolutions Chair

Resolutions and the resolution process are important because they allow all CFUW members to be part of creating CFUW policy. Members across the country may initiate draft resolutions; all members are asked to study them and propose amendments if they wish; then all members have a voice in the voting at the AGM through their Club delegate.

 

A draft resolution begins with a Club or CFUW committee having concern about a particular topic not covered in our Policy Book.  They then go through the step by step process for creating a resolution as detailed in CFUW Resolutions Information and Guidelines.  The Guideline for 2014-2015 is available through a link on cfuw.org under the Advocacy tab.

 

Clubs receive the draft resolutions in November and all have developed a method for members to study and submit amendments to them.  Some Clubs have a special committee to initially study them while some others have pizza or potluck dinners for a resolutions meeting. Suggested amendments go back to the proposing Clubs.  The proposing Club may accept the amendment.  If they do not, any amendment received by the amendment deadline of March 31 can be brought forward again at an event preceding the AGM vote. 

   

Finally, Clubs vote on the final amended proposed resolutions as part of the AGM business meeting.  Those resolutions that are passed are added to our Policy Book and the advocacy work on them begins.

 

Please note: June 30, 2015 is the new deadline date for "Intent to Submit a Resolution" for AGM 2016.

 

The other changed deadline in this year's guideline is May 15, 2015 for any Emergency Resolutions for AGM 2015.

 

Please refer to the Guidelines for 2014-2015 for specific information on what is to be included in a resolution and the steps through the resolutions process.  For any questions, please contact Eleanor Scarth, CFUW Resolutions Chair, 2014-2016, at resolutions@fcfdu.org

Using CFUW Adopted Resolutions to Influence Public Policy 

by Teri Shaw, VP Advocacy

 

Having a resolution proposed, discussed in Clubs across the country and adopted at the National AGM is the first step in any advocacy project involving CFUW.  Adopted resolutions are the bedrock of our policy. Without this policy, CFUW cannot make any comments concerning public policy.

 

This process also occurs within the Councils and the Clubs.  If there is an issue that is local or provincial, resolutions can be passed at these levels as well.  All that is asked is that they do not contravene other policy or our purpose.

 

At all levels, we use adopted resolutions in four ways: as a tool for public awareness, to proactively express our concerns, to create partnerships and coalitions with like-minded organizations, and to react to issues and governments' agendas.

 

The resolution process itself acts as a public awareness tool by bringing an issue to the attention of CFUW members across the country, and once the resolution is adopted, all levels of CFUW - Clubs, Councils and National - are able to hold public meetings and forums, write articles and op-eds - bringing an awareness to the cause or concern.

 

Using both the newly adopted resolutions, as well as our bank of policies as found in the CFUW Policy Book, we are able to be proactive in our advocacy, that is, expressing our concerns to governments in order to get the issue on their agenda.  We do this through letters, meetings and briefs, as well continually attempting to bring issues to the attention of both our members and the public. 

 

We do encourage proposers to continue their advocacy with the assistance of the National Office and Board.

 

Again with the backing of our policies, we are able to create partnerships, both nationally and within the community, and coalitions, linking with other organizations to achieve that common goal. This then extends our influence and assists with our work.

 

Reacting to the government's agenda, or to problems within our communities, is the most prevalent use of adopted resolutions.  Most of the time these are older adopted resolutions found in the Policy Book.  When an issue is "hot", when there is either a plan of action or legislation, when there is a problem to be solved, governments, decision-makers may be prepared to listen to our input. It is here that Clubs and Councils take on campaigns - BC Council with child poverty, CFUW Stratford with public transportation.

 

For many Clubs, the resolution is the first step in an advocacy campaign, going through all the stages of public awareness, pro-active, partnerships and reactive - UWC Vancouver with prostitution, Jeanne Sarson and Linda MacDonald (now of CFUW Truro) with non-state torture, UWC Montreal Inc. with financial literacy, CFUW Oakville with mental health.

 

As everything within public policy must be seen through a "political" lens, our comments are certainly not always heeded, but one never knows when that tipping point occurs, when we do actually push people to do the right thing.  We are a voice of the informed voter.  We just have to remind governments of that - constantly!

 

 

Press Agency


November 2014

 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 

  

These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.

 

If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Doris Mae Oulton, President at  cfuwpres@gmail.com.


In this Issue: 
 

  • The 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project Update #2  

Lynn Franklin, Project Leader, 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project

  • CFUW Charitable Trust 

Fiorenza Albert-Howard, Chair, Charitable Trust

 


The 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project Update #2

Prepared by Lynn Franklin, Project Leader, 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project 

 

The Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW) has supported women's studies since its founding in 1919.  To celebrate the CFUW's 100th Anniversary, the local and national levels of CFUW have as their goal the providing of an additional $100,000 in scholarships and awards in 2019.

 

We are off to a great start!  A generous donation from CFUW Oakville and the successful fundraising pilgrimage on the Camino de Santiago of our immediate Past President Susan Murphy and her friend Monika Oepkes have increased our total of pledged and committed funds to date to over $35,000.

 

As interest in the Scholarship Project increases, so have the questions.  Here are some of the most Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ):

 

Q: Our Club is planning to give a local award for the CFUW 100th anniversary.  Will that count towards the "additional $100,000"?

A: Basically, yes, if three criteria are met.  First, it must be a new award - not currently being given on an annual basis.  Second, it must be given in 2019 and third, it must have included in its name, "CFUW 100th Anniversary".  If all criteria are met then it will count!  And we want to hear from you about your plans for the award, so it can be included in our plans.

 

Q:  Is there an expectation that each Club commits or gives a certain amount of money?

A:  We hope that every Club across Canada - large and small - will be able to participate in the 100th Anniversary Project and join the celebrations.  However, each Club is unique in its operation and will celebrate the 100th Anniversary in the way that is best for it.

 

Q:  Will there be a new National Fellowship called "The CFUW 100th Anniversary Award"?

A:  Donations given to the CFUW Charitable Trust for 100th Anniversary Awards will be used in 2019 to add to the current portfolio of CFUW Fellowships program in the following way - first depending on the funds raised, one or more additional awards will be made in one of the current categories offered such as the CFUW Dr. Alice E. Wilson Award.  Second, the phrase "CFUW 100th Anniversary" will be added to the name of the additional fellowship(s) for that year.  In that way, the CFUW Fellowships Program can support the 100th Anniversary Project without adding significantly to the workload and administration of the Program and the Fellowships Committee.

 

Q: When should we let you know about our plans and what if we have more questions?

A: Clubs and Councils across Canada are discussing their 100th Anniversary activities now.  We would like to know what you are planning as soon as possible.  Please identify your anticipated activities and awards and any questions to the 100th Anniversary Scholarship Project Leader, Lynn Franklin by email at lynn.franklin@sympatico.ca.

 

CFUW Charitable Trust

Prepared by Fiorenza Albert-Howard, Chair of the Charitable Trust

 

The CFUW Charitable Trust, established in 1967, receives donations and supports the Fellowship program.

 

The Trust administers funds for:

  •  CFUW Fellowships and Awards
  •  A biannual CFUW Creative Music Award
  •  A biannual CFUW Library Award.

At the latest CFUW AGM during the CT breakfast, members present were asked if they knew about the CT. Many responded that they were not well informed about the CT - how arms-length it is from CFUW, how it is administered - they were encouraging more information to be provided to the Clubs directly.

 

Some members thought that they had received the same information at previous CT breakfasts. Such information does not change over the years, but possibly something different could be of interest to the members?


 This is, in brief, what you can find online about the Trust. Many members are very aware of the successes of the Fellowship Program, but how many are familiar with the Charitable Trust (CT) itself?


 The CT committee is composed of the Chair who is also the CFUW VP of Finance, the President and the Past President and three members appointed by the Board, one of them to be the CT treasurer. The committee meets in person once a year, in an AGM usually conducted at the end of September, and has one meeting via phone normally in January of the following year.


 The Trust document, amended in 2014, is available and can be provided to those members who are interested in reading it and becoming more informed. 


 An Annual Report booklet was provided to the attendees of the CFUW AGM 2014, and it will be revised every year. A detailed financial statement is available online on the CFUW.org site.

 

Now my questions to those  of you reading this message: 

  • What else would you like to know about the CT? 
  • How would you like the information about the CT to be brought to the Clubs? 
  • How could we help you to better understand the organization and the benefits deriving from it?

Please contact me with your comments at: cfuwvpfinance@gmail.com

 


October 17, 2014

 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 

  

These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.

 

If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Doris Mae Oulton, President at cfuwpres@gmail.com.

 


In this Issue: 
 

  • CFUW Trailblazers: Women Who Know How to Roar

Tara Fischer, Advocacy Coordinator

  • What to Look for in Advocacy This FallTeri Shaw, VP Advocacy and Tara Fischer, Coordinator of Advocacy  



Dr. Alice E. Wilson 

CFUW Trailblazers: 

Women Who Knew How to Roar

Prepared by Tara Fischer, Advocacy Coordinator

To mark Women's History Month in Canada, CFUW is honouring some of the trailblazers that were once members of our organization.

 

Dr. Ann Augusta Stowe-Gullen (1857 - 1943), one of the first members of the University Women's Club Toronto, is known for being the first woman to graduate from a Canadian medical school (Faculty of Medicine at Victoria University, Toronto) in 1883. Her advocacy work led to the establishment of the Ontario Medical College for Women.

Dr. Alice E. Wilson (1881 - 1964) was one of the first recipients of a CFUW scholarship at the age of 44, which opened the door to a long and distinguished career as the first woman to hold a professional position with the Geological Survey of Canada and to be appointed Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1938.  Recognizing the importance of the CFUW scholarship/fellowship program, Dr. Wilson left a bequest to the organization in 1964, establishing the Dr. Alice E. Wilson Awards. The awards are given to four women annually.

Dr. Elizabeth Bagshaw (1881 - 1982) was one of Canada's first female doctors and the medical director of the first (illegal) birth control clinic in Canada despite intense criticism from the medical and religious communities. She served as the clinic's medical director for over 30 years pioneering areas of family medicine that were not widely practiced at the time. Dr. Bagshaw was a member of the University Women's Club of Hamilton.

 

Dr. Elizabeth Bagshaw

Helen Alice Kinnear, Q.C. (1894 - 1970), a former member of the University Women's Club of Toronto, was the first federally appointed woman judge in Canada.

 

Charlotte Elizabeth Whitton, O.C., C.B.E. (1896 - 1975) was a member of the University Women's Club in Ottawa, a feminist, and the first woman mayor of Ottawa (and a major city in Canada), serving from 1951 to 1956 and again from 1960 to 1964.

 

The Honourable Muriel McQueen Fergusson, P.C. O.C. Q.C. (1899 - 1997), a former member of CFUW Ottawa, was the first woman Speaker of the Senate from1972 to 1974, and the first woman deputy mayor of Ottawa in 1953.

 

Phyllis Gregory Ross, O.C., C.B.E. (1903 - 1988) was a Canadian economist and the first woman to serve as a Chancellor in the Commonwealth of Nations. She was a member and President of the University Women's Club in Ottawa.

 

Winona Grace MacInnis, O.C., O.B.C.  (1905 - 1991), a former member of University Women's Clubs of Ottawa and Vancouver, was the first woman from British Columbia to be elected to the House of Commons.

 

Helen Battles Sawyer Hogg, C.C. (1905 - 1993),a former member of the University Women's Club on Toronto,was an astronomer, the first female president of several astronomical organizations, and the first woman to be appointed to the physical sciences division of the Royal Society of Canada.

 

Dr. Jessie Gray (1910 - 1978) was known as Canada's "first lady of surgery", and one of the four leading cancer surgeons in North America at the time. She was a member of the University Women's Club of Toronto, and earned a formidable succession of firsts: first woman gold medalist in medicine at U of T (1934); first woman to obtain the master of surgery degree (1939); first woman resident surgeon at the Toronto General Hospital; first woman fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons (Canada, 1941); first woman member of the Central Surgical Society of North America; and first woman elected to the Science Council of Canada (1966).

 

Dr. Jessie Gray

 

The Hon. Pauline Mills McGibbon, C.C., O. Ont, (1910 - 2001) was a member of the University Women's Club of Toronto, and served as the 22nd Lieutenant Governor of Ontario from 1974 to 1980. In addition to being the first woman to occupy this position, she was the first woman to serve as a viceregal representative.

 

Blanche Margaret Meagher, O.C. (1911 - 1999) was a Canadian diplomat and in 1958 was appointed as Canada's first woman ambassador. She was a member of the University Women's Club of Halifax and served as Ambassador to Israel, Austria and Sweden.

 

Marie-Claire Kirkland-Casgrain, C.M., C.Q. is a Quebec lawyer, judge, politician and former member of CFUW Montreal. She was the first woman elected to the Legislative Assembly of Quebec, the first woman appointed a Cabinet minister in Quebec, the first woman appointed acting premier, and the first woman judge to serve in the Quebec Provincial Court.


What to Look for in Advocacy This Fall

Prepared by Teri Shaw, VP Advocacy and Tara Fischer, Coordinator of Advocacy

Fall brings with it new beginnings as both Parliament and the provincial legislatures reopen across the country.  We have seen some major changes since last spring - new premiers in Alberta and Newfoundland, new governments in New Brunswick and Quebec, and the re-election of the government in Ontario.

 

Concerning elections, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Prince Edward Island and British Columbia all have municipal elections this fall.  Do vote, and do encourage friends, family, co-workers and your extended network to do so.  Municipal governments are responsible for everything from water, waste, and roads to recreation and the social programs that support communities.  It is the government that is the closest to us - and it is the most ignored.

 

The fall advocacy package

In early October Clubs received an advocacy tool-kit by email that includes:

  • Suggested actions for the 2014 adopted resolutions, including template letters and other recommended activities through the year.
  • A template brief on women's equality to send to your Members of Parliament. This brief was adapted from CFUW National's 2015 Pre-Budget Consultation submission.

You can find these resources on the website at:

http://www.cfuw.org/en-ca/advocacy/takeaction.aspx

 

We do hope that you find these useful, and, if your club is willing, to either present or mail these letters and brief to your local Member of Parliament.

 

Up for Debate:

Alliance for Women's Rights Launching Campaign Related to 2015 Federal Election

 

On October 23rd, a new Alliance for Women's Rights will be launching a campaign related to the 2015 federal election. The campaign, Up for Debate, calls on all political party leaders to participate in a televised debate on issues identified by women, and ask them to make meaningful commitments to change women's lives for the better.   

 

CFUW has been working with several organizations, including the YWCA Canada, Oxfam Canada, and others to develop this campaign over the last several months. We are excited to finally share the website, and social media campaign next week, and hope that CFUW Clubs will be interested in taking part. At a later date we will be sharing additional tools related to the campaign to help you connect with other campaign partners and to organize events in your communities.

 

On or after October 23rd visit www.upfordebate.ca and www.placeaudebat.ca.

  

DID YOU KNOW...?

 

That the only federal election leaders' debate on the issues that affect women's lives was held on August 15, 1984 with Brian Mulroney, Ed Broadbent and John Turner.  

See the archival footage here:http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/politics/elections/leaders-debates-1968-2011-highlights/1984-leaders-debate-womens-issues.html

  

That in the 2011 election, ½ million more women than men voted, and that this was true for all age categories up to 65.

  

Other Events

 

October is Women's History Month, with a slew of activities and events taking place across the country. Among these events have been the Sisters in Spirit vigils held on October 4th to honour the memories of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. CFUW National participated in the Ottawa vigil, and many Clubs also attended vigils in their communities.

 

October 11th was the third annual International Day of the Girl Child, and Persons Day will be October 18th. As always, CFUW is very involved with the 16 days of Activism Against Gender Violence from November 25th to December 10th, including the

December 6th commemoration on the National Day of Action and Remembrance on Violence Against Women.

 

To learn more about these activities, and others that involve/interest CFUW, please consult either the Week in Review (http://www.cfuw.org/en-ca/clubsandcouncils/weekinreview.aspx) or the Take Action section of the national website.

 

Learning About, and Keeping Up to Date on CFUW Advocacy

 

Sources of information about advocacy and CFUW:

  • The website, www.cfuw.org, is an excellent source of information, in particular under Advocacy:
    • Take Action - includes links to current campaigns, and Tools for Advocates (our resources and tools for work in advocacy)
    •  Issues - list all our work on various issues
    • United Nations Commission on the Status of Women
    • Policy Book Online
    • Resolutions
  • Week in Review, our newsletter of CFUW actions, links to action alerts, plus a compilation of interesting news articles
  • CFUW News and Updates, while mainly administrative, does include reminders and notices about advocacy related activities.
  • CFUW Advocacy Blog - http://cfuwadvocacy.wordpress.com houses our press releases and commentary
  • Facebook - CFUW-FCFDU (our new public Facebook page) as well as theCFUW Facebook group for discussion among members.



Information for Club Newsletter Editors 


The Press Agency

 

As a way of providing CFUW information to Clubs, each month we will be sending copies of articles to the editors of Club newsletters, for their use. 


 These are articles that we hope will be of interest to members and can be used as editors see fit. There is no obligation to use these articles and they will be 'stored' on the CFUW admin website for use at any time.

 

If you have any questions about this service or suggestions for its content, please contact Doris Mae Oulton, President at cfuwpres@gmail.com.

 

In this Issue: 

  • CFUW and Canada's Beijing +20 Review

Tara Fischer, Advocacy Coordinator

  • Club Support Document

by Karen Dunnett, VP Membership

 


CFUW and Canada's Beijing +20 Review

by Tara Fischer, Advocacy Coordinator


September 2015 will mark 20 years since the 4th World Conference on Women in Beijing where countries came together to develop a women's empowerment agenda, also known as the Beijing Platform for Action.  Since the 4th World Conference, the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW), and UN Regional Economic and Social Councils have reviewed countries' progress every 5 years; this year being the 20 year review process. As a result, women's rights organizations around the world are taking stalk of the progress, or lack thereof, within their respective countries. Needless to say, this is an important time to deliberate on what more Canada and other countries could be doing to fully achieve women's rights and gender equality.


 In Canada, a group of more than 30 organizations, including CFUW, have assembled to develop a joint report providing an overview of the current status of women within the 12 critical areas of concern covered by the Platform for Action, including:

  • Women and Poverty;
  • Education and Training of Women;
  • Women and Health; Violence against Women;
  • Women and Armed Conflict; Women and the Economy;
  • Women in Power and Decision-making;
  • Institutional Mechanism for the Advancement of Women;
  • Human Rights of Women; Women and the Media;
  • Women and the Environment; and
  • The Girl-child

The group has also identified a number of additional concerns that were not explicitly covered in the Platform for Action, such as issues affecting Aboriginal, Immigrant, Migrant, Refugee and LGBTQ+ women and girls, as well as Caregiving, and Food Security.


 By pooling our expertise and knowledge, we hope to develop a comprehensive and accurate picture of the status of women and girls in Canada that will serve as an important tool to hold policymakers accountable. Working towards a release date at the end of October, the report will be available for the Canada's regional review from November 6-7 at the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe in Geneva (where IFUW will be representing CFUW). It will also form the basis of a joint written submission to the UNCSW in March, where CFUW has a presence annually.


 The draft report shows that Canada falls significantly short of meeting the objectives set out in the Platform for Action, and proves that advocacy for women's empowerment is just as relevant as ever!

CFUW's participation in this initiative is valuable because it helps us meet the advocacy priorities set by the Advocacy Standing Committee and the Board of Directors for 2014/2015, those being Education, Violence against Women, Women's Economic Security and Leadership, along with the objective of helping strengthen the women's movement in Canada.


 In my experience working for CFUW over the last 3 years, I can say with certainty that we are an important part of a resurgent women's movement that has been rather sleepy for the last several years as a result of funding cuts, advocacy chill, and many organizational closures. With the Beijing +20 review process, and an upcoming federal election, there is momentum and energy for women's rights groups to work together. This coming year is bound to be an exciting one, and we hope that Clubs will join us in raising awareness about the continued need to promote women's equality in communities across Canada.


 

Club Support Document

by Karen Dunnett, VP Membership

As the Club year begins, it is good to remind ourselves of all the benefits of being a CFUW Club member. 


 This list can help us remember them. You can customize it to your Club too, and include it with your membership renewal material, add it to a club email, newsletter, or make it part of your Club opening greetings!


 
Why be a CFUW Member?

 

Where, for the cost of a membership, could you claim to be a member of a national women's organization with close to 10,000 members?

 

Where, for the cost of a membership, could you claim to support a national organization that presents briefs to the Provincial and Federal governments annually outlining our current policies and advocates for:

  • equality for women and girls
  • a strong educational system
  • the protection of human rights.

 Where, for the cost of a membership, could you claim, through CFUW's affiliation with IFUW, to:

  • support women and girls throughout the world
  • have a voice and influence through its UN advocacy, stressing education and the status of women
  • be offered hospitality afforded CFUW members travelling abroad
  • be able to form links of friendships between global affiliates.

Where, for the cost of a membership, could you be part of support to the over $85,000 per year in national Fellowships awarded for graduate level studies (Clubs across Canada gave one million dollars in scholarship and awards)?

 

I know that you are well aware that it takes money to do all of these things. Besides the money, many women volunteer their time and expertise to promote these values and do this work. I am happy there are such women who can, and I for one, am happy to support their efforts on my behalf.

 

The quote below was once said to a women's graduating class. I think it exemplifies why we need to support an organization like CFUW.

 

"Your degree does not belong to its present tenant alone. Your education was lent to you by women of the past, and you will give some back to living women and to your daughters seven generations from now".